Emergency Pack for Trail Running or Mountain Biking While on Anticoagulants (Coumadin, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Plavix)

This article is a work in progress and is only a description of my strategy for the time being. I hope to learn from readers of this blog about how to better plan for a trail debacle.

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Heading out for a trail run on the Pacific Crest Trail

What kinds of things should a person like me, who is dealing with atrial fibrillation and is taking an anticoagulant (I take Pradaxa), carry on a long run in the wilderness? Or during a long mountain bike ride in remote areas?

When the high country in our local wildernesses is not covered with snow, I will generally do runs, nearly every weekend, of anywhere between six to twenty miles. I almost always run alone (except for my trail buddy – Ringo).

Dangerous and a bad idea? Possibly. But this is what I enjoy in life so I don’t plan on stopping any time soon.

The most important piece of equipment is a phone. People complain that everybody is always on their smartphone, and they should NOT be talking on their phones on mountain summits when everybody else is trying to get all Zen-like and self-actualized, and whatever – that’s a different discussion. You certainly don’t even need to have your phone on; but you absolutely should take it with you, and it should be fully charged. The days of getting hopelessly lost and spelling out SOS with rocks hoping a search plane will find you are fading into the past. A smartphone is a GPS and a direct link to help.

I always carry my iPhone in a baggie with my ID and a sheet of paper towel (which I use for unrelated toilet purposes).

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Fully charged and protected from water

Even if there is poor cell phone coverage in your local high mountain or deep canyon wilderness, and a phone call isn’t always possible, I find that a text message can often still be sent. It might take a while but it eventually will be sent, especially if I am moving along a trail.

There is the standard emergency gear that most people take, often called the “ten essentials” which most people carry while in the wilderness. Of course there is truly no such thing as a standard ten essentials and the list of things you carry will vary depending on the season, your skill set, your location, and your past experience.

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My generic survival gear

I got out my little survival kit that I typically carry in the wilderness, and of course not everything is pictured here, and I might not even have all of this stuff with me on any given trip. Naturally I will also have other things like food, gels, electrolytes, a jacket, and plenty of water.

What I found in my default wilderness pack is:

Two knives – a mini-leatherman tool and a standard knife. I will only actually carry one of these.

Two lights – a headlamp and a tiny LED flashlight (one is plenty).

Fire starter – a cigarette lighter, birthday candles, a tampon, and hand sanitizer (which I discovered has completely evaporated).

A space blanket, a compass.

Repair gear (Shoe laces, tenacious tape, dental floss)

Pain pills: Vicoprofen samples – okay they expired in 2000 but I’m guessing they are still good (at least for a placebo effect). Missing: Benadryl for allergies or yellow jacket stings, and I probably should have some of my Pradaxa in case I end up unexpectedly staying out overnight. Also missing: small roll of duct tape, safety pins, and my whistle!

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Saint Christopher Medal

Oh, and there is a Saint Christopher medal. This one belonged to my grandfather. Well it probably won’t change anything, but it certainly couldn’t hurt. Feel free to substitute your own personal good luck charm.

But what about specific items for the runner on an anticoagulant? Is there anything else beyond the “ten essentials”?

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Other stuff: Map with reading glasses (if needed) and some rope

Obviously having a major bleed while running alone in the wilderness would be a disaster. Death is certainly a possibility. How can a trail runner prepare to increase the odds of a good outcome?

I always make sure to let somebody know (usually my wife) where I’m going and I also send her a text (I text “OOTW” short for “out of the woods”) when I get back to my vehicle.

I also wear a Road ID. This way if somebody finds me they will know I am on an anticoagulant. Maybe this won’t help, but it certainly is worth wearing. At least they will be able to figure out why I bled out so quickly (I know – not funny).

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My Road ID

Another item I always carry is a bandanna. This can be used for a number of purposes, such as making a field dressing; but I want to have it in case I need a tourniquet. Plus – I have an extra one because my trail dog always has one draped around his neck.

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Bandanna

My bandanna came in handy a week ago when my wife Margo (not on an anticoagulant) crashed her mountain bike and punctured her left thigh with her brake lever. I used it to make a compressive dressing before we road our bikes back to where we could get a ride to the hospital.

One item I do not currently have but definitely need to obtain is a Quickclot field dressing. Evidently these things really work and are routinely used in combat situations. It is a topical coagulant (an anti-anti-coagulant?) which helps clot blood and also serves as a physical barrier to bleeding. I’ve been meaning to obtain one of these for a long time. They are available online via amazon.com, and I just ordered one.

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Quickclot

Question: Will the Quickclot sponge even work on bleeding in an individual who is on a direct thrombin inhibitor like Pradaxa? Answer: I have no idea. I’ll let you know if I ever get a chance to find out.

In case of bleeding the most important first step is to apply direct pressure. As a surgeon I have a lot of experience with this. Usually sixty seconds of direct thumb pressure will stop or slow most bleeding, but of course if you take an anticoagulant it will take longer. Apply direct pressure as long as necessary. Elevate the wound if possible. Don’t try to clean out major wounds as this will restart bleeding – that can be done later at the hospital.

A tourniquet is a last resort, but the bandanna can be used as a compressive dressing if needed.

Please understand that an anticoagulant doesn’t completely stop clotting of blood, it just makes it take longer. Eventually bleeding will stop. Hopefully before all the blood leaves your body!

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Ringo always has a spare bandanna for me

Bonus – How to stop a nosebleed:

I have been plagued by frequent nosebleeds since I was a child but, oddly enough, I haven’t had a single nosebleed since I started Pradaxa a couple of years ago. The best method I have found is to pinch the nose, fairly tightly, just above the nostrils, and lean forward. Don’t lie with your head back – that doesn’t work. Hold for a full sixty seconds. Repeat as necessary.

If you are, like me, a trail runner or mountain biker on an anticoagulant, I would love to hear from you. Please leave comments and suggestions in the comments area below.

Thanks.

Mountain Bike Injury – Thigh Impaled by Brake Lever

Not me – my wife, Margo.

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Before Crashing

While I have been trail riding and trail running on technical trails since 1988, my wife Margo, although fit, generally stays off of steep, rocky stuff. She likes rail trails, or the easy trails near Lake of the Woods (Oregon) – but she only gets on single track about once per year.

I was delighted, of course, last Sunday when she agreed to do a “real” mountain bike ride with me. We headed out from home and rode to Moore Park via the Link River Trail, then up the Ridgeview, Blueberry and Linda’s Trails then we descended via the Half Gallon and Big Sky Trails.

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Note small hole in tights

As we rode I tried to let her know when various hazards were coming, and we both walked through most of the rock gardens. We were almost to the bottom of Big Sky Trail, and ready to finish up on a couple of easy trails, when I (foolishly) commented, “Well, you made it. No crashes. Great job.”

And while we rode the last bit of trail I was hoping that she would suddenly start to love “real” mountain biking, and was thinking how if she did like it she would really need a newer, better bike than the super heavy ten year old hard tail she rides – I heard her crash behind me.

It was sort of a freak accident on a slightly rocky downhill section approaching the last switchback on Big Sky Trail. I turned back to see her prone on top of her bike – she had evidently done an endo.

“Are you alright?”

“I don’t don’t know which way to move my leg,” she said. She couldn’t get her left leg off of her bike. She was stuck.

I dismounted and ran back to her, and immediately lifted her, by her hips, straight up off of the bike, rotated her to a supine position, and placed her on the ground next to her bike.

“Are you hurt?”

“I don’t think so.”

She stood up and I noticed she had a little hole in the front of her (brand new) tights. The upper, inner left thigh.

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“We better check that.” She pulled down her tights and there was a small wound about one square centimeter with some subcutaneous fat bulging out and a small trickle of blood. It looked just like an incision for a laparoscopic port. “Shit! It went in. We need to get you to the emergency department to deal with this.”

Surprisingly, she seemed fine. No pain. Very little bleeding. She did not appear to be in distress other than being understandably freaked out. It’s fortunate that Margo didn’t realize what had actually happened until much later.

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Before Treatment

I made a makeshift bandage out of a bandanna I carry with me for this exact purpose, we pulled her tights back up, and began to ride out. I didn’t want to have to ride all the way home so I called a friend to meet us at Moore Park to take Margo to the hospital. It turns out she was 100 miles away on a kayak trip. We then called our son Terry and he loaded up his three small children and met us at the gingerbread house at Moore Park.

I don’t recall ever seeing Margo pedal a mountain bike so quickly on a trail as that last mile or so back to the gingerbread house! I trailed behind her marinating in “survivor guilt.”

Terry dropped us off at the Emergency Department and brought our bikes home. This was our first ED visit in twenty plus years. I’m sorry to admit that I “pulled the doctor card” and asked them to tell the ER doc on call that I was there (we’re personal friends) and we got right in. So much for hours of waiting in the ED reception area.

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“She’s a rock.”

From there it was uneventful. This was a very blunt trauma; but it was clear from the bruise on the back of her thigh that when she crashed the brake lever handle went all the way through her and hit the back of her thigh. Luckily, because the end was so blunt (it actually had a bulb-like tip) it didn’t cut anything and surely went right around any nerves or blood vessels.

Treatment consisted of a tetanus booster, a gram of Ancef (antibiotic), flushing the wound out with sterile saline, and then trimming the rough areas and bulging subcutaneous fat. She was also given a prescription for ten days on an oral antibiotic. No sutures (so it could drain if need be).

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After Debridement

Margo was a rock. It reminded me of the line in Repo Man where Bud lies to Otto that his wife is pregnant and he needed Otto to take her car (actually getting Otto to repo a car for him). Later Otto asks, “What happened to your old lady?” Otto replies, “My old lady? Oh, shit, I forgot all about her. Well, she’ll take the bus. She’s a rock.”

After it was all over and she finally realized what had happened, and how far that stupid brake lever handle penetrated her thigh, well, she started getting a bit dizzy. Every time we got up to leave she had to lie down again; but we eventually went home. Poor Margo.

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Relaxing after a bike ride

At this point, four days later, she’s doing fine and still only has minimal pain. But “it’s creepy pain” she says – because it is only in the back of her leg, not where it went in.

Doing an internet search on this injury I find that it really isn’t an uncommon injury, although I hope to never see it again. In some cases the brake lever had become stuck in the injured rider. And the thigh is the most common site, but not the only site. There are some pretty gruesome descriptions of this injury if you want to check them out.

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She didn’t want to put the tights back on

I’m happy I just pulled her up off of the brake lever immediately. Some of these poor people were clowning around for hours with a person stuck to the bicycle. That sounds unpleasant and might be an example of people making things more complicated than they need to be. See the video below for an example of a brake lever that actually became stuck in a young woman’s thigh.


This young woman had an injury similar to Margo’s injury

After this injury I doubt that I will get Margo back out on the single track any time soon – but I truly do think it is important that she at least get back on her bike again soon; otherwise she may have difficulty enjoying riding her mountain bike again.

As for me, I already rode that some trail again. Here is a photo of my bike placed at the spot (and position) where she crashed:

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This is my bike at the site of Margo’s crash

If anybody has any experience with this type of injury, or if you have any comments at all, please reply below.

Sorry about the lack of atrial fibrillation content in this post. Scroll down for plenty of a fib content.

Oregon Outback Bike Tour and the OC&E Woods Line State Trail

(Sorry about the lack of atrial fibrillation content in this post.)

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I am considering participating in the 2014 Oregon Outback bike tour. I love the concept of the Oregon Outback tour – it is a 360 mile unsupported bike tour, most of which is on remote dirt roads (and trails) in the barely populated Eastern part of Oregon (commonly referred to as Oregon’s Outback).

The best part is that the beginning of the ride, the first seventy five miles or so, is on the OC&E Woods Line State Trail – a 100 mile long Rails to Trails project that is a long, narrow Oregon State Park.

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OC&E Trail

I live near and use the OC&E trail a lot and have trained for about twenty (?) marathons on it, and frequently ride bikes on it as well.

I’ve logged thousands of miles on The OC&E – not really because of the scenery, but mostly because it is nearby, the ideal surface, the mile markers every 1/2 mile, and because it is a place where I can run with my well-trained dog off leash. Plus I’m totally used to it.

I have a ton of photos in my Flickr set.

The trail was originally a logging railroad, beginning in 1917, and was used by Weyerhaeuser to transport logs and lumber from Bly, Oregon (where they once had a sawmill) and areas East of Klamath Falls to their main mill and the main railways in Klamath Falls. As everybody know the logging industry isn’t what it used to be and the railroad was shut down and “rail banked” in 1992.

I can give a little background on the development of the trail – I was part of the original group that developed the trail back in 1992. There were about nine of us that were part of an organization supporting the trail and we had plenty of opposition. Most notably there was an opposing group consisting 150 well organized adjacent land-owners that fought the establishment of the trail. They gave a number of reasons for their opposition, including a lot of concerns for privacy, and worries about potential criminal activity on the trail; but I always felt the real reason was that if the land wasn’t rail-banked the adjacent land-owner would get all the land back for free – that’s a strip of land 100 feet wide and about a hundred miles long.

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Ringo on the Roof

I never really thought the trail would happen. There were other groups opposing the trail including a group that wanted to leave the rails in place and build a recreational railway – train rides for tourists. We never even bothered opposing that idea because we knew that Weyerhaeuser had already sold the ties and the rails for the highest price ever to a salvage company – 4.5 million dollars (1992) and the excursion train people would have to buy them back from the salvage company. I don’t think they had anywhere near that kind of cash.

Probably the least pleasant group opposing the trail was the Nature Conservancy. They own a large portion of the Sycan Marsh where the Woods Line portion of the trail passes. This is the most remote and least used portion of the trail. The biologist’s concern was that the train tracks, which are on a raised ballast, divide the wetland into two distinct eco-systems with slightly different gene populations – certain creatures couldn’t cross from one side to the other. I never quite understood why that was a problem, but evidently it was. For some reason we thought the Nature Conservancy would be in favor of a recreational trail – after all they are a nature conservancy, and who doesn’t love nature, the great outdoors, hiking, etc. – but no – they wanted the entire rail ballast removed and NO TRAIL.

I have never actually been on the Woods Line section of the trail. To this day that section of the trail isn’t used as much as the sections near town.

When I saw the photos of the tour directors of the Oregon Outback wading through the water in the Sycan Marsh I immediately understood the purpose of those breaks in the trail – that must’ve been a compromise with the Nature Conservancy. Now the little creatures can frolic and canoodle with the little creatures from the other side of the tracks – brilliant!

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Taking a Break

Anyway – given all the opposition to the trail I never really believed it would happen; but it turns out the trail became a reality in 1992. The way I see it the real powerful people in the world (like the railroads, the power company, telecommunication companies, etc.) liked preserving the right of way so they could rebuild railroads, or put up power lines, or communications cables, or whatever, without much problem. That’s the goal of rail banking – to preserve the right of way for projects like railroads, pipelines, telecommunications – and little community forums and debates are, I believe, just for show – big companies run the world. It makes sense – after seeing the level of opposition the adjacent landowners raised for the trail on existing right of way it would be unimaginably difficult to build, say, a pipeline through that property if they owned it – it would take years of lawsuits and expensive land purchases. One hold-out landowner could cancel an entire project. Rail banking makes it less complicated.

And in the case of rail banking outdoor enthusiasts benefit. And the community can benefit when folks like the Oregon Outback group or Cycle Oregon decide to use the trail.

I was fortunate enough to tour the trail via one of those trucks that rides on rails after the railroad was closed but before the rails and ties were salvaged. It was a wonderful day and a chance to see the entire route in one morning with a picnic lunch in Bly, Oregon to boot. Our group did a similar tour of the Woods line portion but for some reason I missed that one. I still want to get out there and see the large treacle that remains from the railway days.

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Jan and Her Sister-in-law

The trail has quite of variety of personalities. The first one and one half mile is unpaved (last time I was there) and passes through an industrial area, including some switching yards and some transient camps. This area is infrequently used by joggers, etc.

From the 1.5 mile marker to the 8.5 mile marker the trail is paved and first passes through a commercial area of Klamath Falls and then the “South Suburban” area. This is the most densely used portion of the trail and local people walk their dogs, roller blade, ride bikes, jog, walk – you name it. On a nice day I’ll encounter dozens of people on this section; I frequently ride my road bike on this section but generally don’t run there because I prefer to run off pavement plus I like to run with my little cow dog, Ringo, off leash.

My favorite and (personally) most frequently used sections are the section from Reeder Road (6 mile marker) to about the 13 mile marker (past Olene,Oregon) and of course the Switchback Mountain section near Sprague River, OR.

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Ten Mile Marker

Olene is a “town” that has about three or four houses and one store. There is a nice parking area there that I use as a headquarters for long runs (like the twenty mile runs that are part of a marathon training program). I will do a number of “out and backs” starting in Olene and use my truck as a resupply depot to refill my hydration pack after ten miles or so, and also restock things like carbohydrate gels and electrolyte supplements.

Horse riders often like to park their trailers here and start their trail rides in Olene, including people with tiny miniature horses they use to pull little carts.

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Little Horses

Another good starting point is the picnic area at Switchback Mountain near Sprague River, Oregon. This is a unique section of rail trail – the train would do a “double Y” switchback in order to get over the mountain – as far as I know it was the only railroad in the United States that did so. This is the only hilly section of the trail and for that reason is a great place to train if a hilly race is in my future. Plus it is adjacent to “Devil’s Garden” which as one might imagine is an area of spooky lava rock formations – a fun place to explore. Switchback Mountain is thirty-five miles from Klamath Falls so it only works as a starting point if I have enough time to drive that far.

The actual quality of the trail surface is quite variable and runs the gamut from exquisitely paved to extremely overgrown and rocky. The highly used areas are generally very peasant to run on – but once the trail gets past Sprague River, Oregon there are a lot of hazards including large clunky chunks of ballast rocks, overgrown weeds and sagebrush, and of course cows.

I have been chased, once, by a young bull out there. Mostly I encounter herds of cattle that just stare and refuse to move, or else they follow me after I pass. In general they don’t mind me, but it’s my cow dog they could do without.

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After Work Ride Near Olene

Other animals along the trail include the usual suspects for our area – jack rabbits, coyotes, badgers, deer, antelope, mountain lions, bears, turkeys – but primarily cows and horses.

A friend of mine recently ran (in sections) the entire OC&E including the Woods Line. It was an all Summer project for him. He said he met quite a few cows out there. I have ran or ridden most of the OC&E excluding the Woods Line.

I’m attracted to the Oregon Outback ride because I’m intrigued to keep going, to break past the limited area that I’ve been running and explore the entire state beyond the OC&E trail – all the way to the Washington border – wow. Sounds like a great adventure.

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Running and Mountain Biking with Atrial Fibrillation? Get a Road I.D.

I used the see the Road I.D. commercials while watching the Tour de France and think, “Why would anybody buy a thing like that?” That was before I went into persistent atrial fibrillation and started taking a potent anticoagulant (Pradaxa).

Now something as ordinary and routine as falling down on a trail run or crashing on a mountain bike can become a big deal – maybe even a life and death situation.

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My Road I.D. has my name, year of birth, hometown, my wife’s number and my sister’s number. Also it indicates that I am in Atrial Fibrillation, have no drug allergies, and am taking Pradaxa – an anticoagulant.

This way if I am found dead they know who I am and who to call to come pick up the bike and the body. If I’m still alive they will know about the atrial fibrillation and the anticoagulant. Pradaxa doesn’t have a reversal agent but any medical personnel will know to watch for bleeding and start an IV to push fluids. It certainly couldn’t hurt.

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Wearing my Road I.D. at a pizza parlor

I wear mine whenever I ride or run, and also whenever I drive. I take it off at work.

I was half joking when I said “if I’m found dead” but somebody (I can’t recall who) recently noticed my Road I.D. and said he wished his friend (brother-in-law?) had had one. Evidently he had gone out for a run and died out there (for whatever reason) and had no identification. Nobody knew who he was so they put the body in the morgue for the weekend. I seem to recall that the wife was out of town and they had a hard time figuring out who he was. Eventually when they started to figure out who he was and one of his children had to come from out of town to identify the body. I wish I could remember the details more clearly – but at any rate a Road I.D. wristband would simplify a situation like that.

There’s nothing special or unique about a Road I.D. – any medical alert bracelet would be fine; but a Road I.D. just seems cooler. It’s durable, comes in cool colors, and is highly customizable, it cleans up well when worn in the post work out shower, and goes on and off easily.

Atrial Fibrillation and Weight Loss or How To Lose Forty Pounds

As I stated previously, when I first discovered that I was in persistent atrial fibrillation I decided that I needed to lose about 40 pounds, and I did.

It just makes sense that if my cardiac output is reduced by atrial fibrillation then I needed to jettison some excess weight.

My days of being a 235 pound marathon runner were over. My way range over the last twelve years has actually been between 220 and 250 pounds. People were so used to see me that my “normal” weight that when I started to get under 200 pounds they would ask me if I was ill, or even if I had cancer.

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Pre-race

Losing weight is easier than one would think. There are a lot of methods that work, but the most important thing is to make up your mind. It’s like quitting smoking cigarettes – it’s extremely difficult if your heart isn’t in it, but if you have truly make the decision there’s no stopping you.

I have loved drinking beer for my entire adult (and teenage) life, but three years ago I decided to completely quit drinking any form of alcohol. As a matter of fact I try not to take in any calories via liquid. Just quitting drinking beer was good for a ten or fifteen pound weight loss. But even as a teetotaler I could find myself drifting up into the 230s.

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Beer Drinking

Over the years I’ve used various methods to lose weight and I’d like to briefly discuss them, and then discuss what I’m doing now, which seems to work the best.

Before I actually tried it I had always thought that a low-carb/Atkins diet was a sort of parlor trick. People on it just deplete their glycogen stores (glycogen also holds a lot of water in the muscles) and have a weight loss that wasn’t really true fat loss. But I started seeing patients who were losing a hundred pounds and more on a low-carb diet – eating a lot of meat and high-fat foods like coffee drinks loaded with heavy cream.

As a person who has been reading Bicycling magazine and Runner’s World for the last several decades I was stuck on the fact that athletes need a lot of carbohydrates in order to train properly. But I decided to try the Atkins diet for two weeks, using my body as an experimental laboratory, fully expecting that it would affect my training and that I would quit after two weeks.

That particular Summer I wasn’t running very much but had been training for some centuries (100 mile bicycle rides) in the Fall. I doubted I would be able to get up any of our mountains without carbohydrates. I was wrong. I found I was able to train normally on a low-carb diet and the sheer amount of weight loss was astounding. Different people, obviously, have different metabolisms – but I found I was able to lose about 30 pounds in six weeks utilizing a low-carb diet.

But there were definitely problems with a low-carb diet for me personally. Intuitively I could tell it was not healthy. You can eat bacon for lunch and think “this is great,” but you can’t honestly believe “this is healthy.” It changes, in an unpleasant way, the smell of your breath, the smell of your sweat, and the smell of your bowel movements.

Another big problem was that I was never able to stay on an low-carb diet for more than six weeks at a time. I didn’t crave carbohydrates – I just got bored. I grew so weary of eating steak that I would sometimes just skip meals.

I also found that while I could train for long-distance bicycling on a low-carb diet, running on a low-carb diet was definitely different. I could still go out and complete long training runs, up to 20 miles, but I was totally wrecked afterwards. My recovery was terrible and sometimes I would come home from a long run, take a shower, and just go to bed.

These are the things I discovered by using my body as an experimental lab.

After abandoning low-carb diet once and for all, I tried the guidelines outlined in Racing Weight by Matt Fitzgerald. This is great if you are already at a good weight, or just need to lose a couple of pounds – but it really isn’t calorie restrictive. It’s all about the quality of the food you eat. That book was interesting because it had a long section of a day in the (diet) life of quite a number of endurance athletes.

I made my own modifications to his points system and printed up little daily tally sheets to keep in my pocket and keep track of my points each day. I would try for thirty points per day. The main problem with this diet is that you can actually eat a lot of good, healthy food, but still can eat a lot of calories.

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Trail Lunch

A couple of years ago I discovered, for me, absolutely the best way to actually lose weight. I used an iPhone/Internet app called Lose it! There are several similar applications including My Fitness Pal, Weight Watchers Mobile, etc.

With these applications you simply enter your age, gender, and weight – and then you enter how much weight you want to lose per week. The app then tells you exactly how many calories you can eat per day, and efficiently helps you keep track. It doesn’t matter what you eat, you just need to log everything, and nearly every type of food seems to be pre-entered into the application (including foods from specific restaurants). If you eat or drink something that has a barcode on it, like a Clif Bar for example, just scan it. If you log your exercise the program adds more calories to your day.

I think just utilizing an application like Lose it! makes it worthwhile getting a smart phone.

Some pitfalls, obviously, include miscalculating how much food you actually ate. At first I wasn’t very good at figuring out what one tablespoon actually means. For example – a tablespoon of peanut butter doesn’t mean actually scooping out as much peanut butter as possible with a tablespoon. That’s more like four tablespoons.

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Peterson Ridge Rumble

The exercise aspect of it, I felt, was extremely good. But calories for running are based on your weight, time spent running, and your pace. It really does not take into account whether or not the run was hilly, however. As a big, slow endurance athlete I was able to burn up a lot of calories just by being out there for several hours on any given work out.

Although I attribute my 40 pound weight loss to this iPhone app, I no longer log anything I eat with Lose it! but I still use it to log calories burned during workouts, as a rough guide.

Ultimately I discovered the documentary Forks Over Knives. The scientist in me found the data very compelling. I then read Eat to Live Joel Furhman – and between the documentary and this book I completely changed the way I eat. Both of these are manifestos, of course, and are manipulative to a certain extent, but I think they are correct.

At this point in time I would call myself a lackadaisical vegan. I say lackadaisical because I really don’t read the ingredients for things such as bread, which I know will contain some dairy or eggs, but for the most part I am a vegan.

Oh, and I also have trouble avoiding pizza or ice cream which I will have about once per week. So I’m really no vegan, but I guess I’m a vegetarian. We make our own pizza and it’s good stuff – kale, onions, mushrooms, broccoli, and green peppers. At this point in time I can maintain my weight with the semi-vegan diet, and no longer need to log food or count calories. If I started gaining weight again I would definitely utilize the Lose it! app in order to get back down to target weight.

So that’s how I did it.

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Peterson Ridge Rumble

Any restrictive diet is effective, no matter which diet, because you end up eating less. For me personally I have found that the low-carb diet clearly allows incredibly fast, significant weight loss – but I didn’t feel that it was healthy. I know that my nearly vegan diet is healthy – I never had high cholesterol to begin with but the last time I checked my LDL cholesterol (a.k.a. bad cholesterol) it was sixty-one. I don’t take any medications except for Pradaxa. I didn’t know LDL cholesterol could even go that low!

I would be interested in hearing from other endurance athletes with atrial fibrillation, especially about changes in diet. Please feel free to leave comments.

Mountain Biking and Atrial Fibrillation

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Mountain Biking in Oregon – Waldo Lake Trail

I’ve just returned from a nearly three-hour long mountain bike ride, so I thought it would be a good time to write about mountain biking while in persistent atrial fibrillation (this discussion is pertaining specifically to persistent A fib meaning I am always in atrial fibrillation and don’t ever expect to NOT be in a fib; I think people who have episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation are going to have a different result).

One of my main concerns when I was first verified to have persistent atrial fibrillation was whether or not would be able to continue mountain biking. I started road riding in the early 80s, back when I still lived in the Midwest. When I moved to Klamath Falls, Oregon in 1987 I began mountain biking. This is a great place to ride, and we have a terrific trail system at Moore Park, as well as a couple of local high mountain singletrack trails that are legal for mountain biking (Brown Mountain Trail, Rye Spur Trail). I feel real connection to these trails and have been riding some of them for over twenty-five years.

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Rye Spur Trail, Klamath County, Oregon

I didn’t use to run is much as I do now, and back in the late 80s and early 90s I would pretty much mountain bike five or six days per week. I have developed some good bike handling skills, especially since in the early days there was no front or rear suspension, and nobody really knew what they were doing anyway. We pretty much plunged our quick release seat posts down into the frame, switched to granny gear as soon as we hit dirt, and would (inappropriately) lock up our back wheels and skid down steep hills – very much discouraged in this modern era. But that’s the way it was – skills develop over time.

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One of my old mountain bikes

At any rate I have developed good skills – skills specific to these particular trails, seeing that I generally know every rock and anticipate every little drop off.

There are two issues with mountain biking and atrial fibrillation. The first, obviously, is that my cardiac output is reduced by about 15 or 20%, so naturally I am a little bit slower. People get slower when they get older, too, so there’s that to deal with as well. But the real issue, I think, is the fact that I am on a potent anticoagulant – Pradaxa. One of the disadvantages of Pradaxa is that it works really well (but the real disadvantages that it does not have a reversal agent). Clearly – there is a risk of bleeding associated with crashing your mountain bike on the trail.

I sort of doubt whether Coumadin is that much safer than Pradaxa as far as this is concerned – while it is true that there is a reversal agent for Coumadin, what is the likelihood that, if I had a major crash, I would be able to get to the emergency department in time for them to give me the reversal agent? I generally ride alone, and our trails are pretty remote. It would take a while for me to get out of there, especially if I was bleeding all over the place, or even worse, if I were bleeding into the space previously occupied by important parts of my brain.

Over the years my skills have improved and my style has changed quite a bit. At age 53 I’m no longer much of a daredevil (I never really was). Back when I was thirty and was riding about five days per week, I estimated that I had one minor crash per week, and usually one major crash per season. In all that time I think I’ve only actually hit my head once (I definitely recall a bleeding ear after crashing on a technical descent on a trail called Garbage – never liked that trail).

I have always felt that all of your instincts and reflexes are directed toward protecting the head. It’s automatic.

Of course I have worn a helmet when bicycling since 1983. I even bought a new helmet when I went into atrial fibrillation and started anticoagulation. It fits better than my old one and it’s florescent green, so hopefully I have less chance of being run over by a pickup truck.

The only time I have ever had a significant bleeding problem while mountain biking was back in 1990. I came off the trail ride and was heading around the paved road at Moore Park to the picnic area to get some water when some young guys in a pickup shouted at me, “Wrong way, dude!” I didn’t yell back at them, but I turned around and glared at them as I zipped down a little hill to the picnic area, giving them a look that said, “You talkin’ to me?” I was going pretty fast at that point and hit a speed bump that sent me skidding across the pavement for a while.

I bet those guys were impressed.

Anyway, I had a lot of road rash, was just goes with bicycling to a certain extent, but the worst thing was I had a “degloving injury” on the side of my abdomen. What that means is that part of my skin more or less stuck to the pavement while the rest of me kept moving and the skin was pulled away from the underlying tissue. It didn’t break all the way through the skin, but I developed a hematoma the size of a baseball right where the “love handle” would normally be. Twenty-three years later it’s actually still there to a certain extent, not the blood, but a big lump of scar tissue beneath the skin, and the skin over that area is still kind of numb.

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Klamath Ridgeview Trail – Moore Park

That happened with no anticoagulation – I never even took an aspirin back then. If I had a similar injury now that would’ve been a major hematoma – I might even need a transfusion.

That’s the risk. Falls are part of riding a mountain bike. I’ve been on Pradaxa for a year now and I think I’ve only had two crashes. I am so much more cautious than I used to be that I rarely ever crash, and when I do crash it usually something stupid like having mud or ice in my pedals and not been able to click out when stopping, falling over like Artie Johnson used to do on that tricycle on Rowan and Martin’s Laugh In. I honestly can’t say that I’ve noticed more bruising or bleeding than I would expect prior to Pradaxa. So far, so good.

I feel it is important, however, that when you’re cardiologist tells you that you probably shouldn’t be mountain biking that you do what he says. Don’t be like me. Don’t disregard your cardiologist advice. Do as I say, not as I do.

All joking aside – there is a certain risk and if you can accept that level of risk, then continue mountain biking. If not, stay off the trails.

As far as how much persistent atrial fibrillation affects my climbing, well, when I first get started it is quite difficult. After I warm up it really doesn’t seem like it’s any different than not be in atrial fibrillation. Recall that I do not take anything like a beta blocker or an antiarrhythmic – if you take medications like that your experience may definitely be different. All I take is the anticoagulant.

I’m slow, definitely slower than I was twenty-five years ago, but it almost seems like it’s within the realm of what you’d expect from being that much older. Like I said in the article about running in atrial fibrillation, it’s almost like you’re a pickup truck with a four speed manual transmission, but you can only use second and third gear. But you can still have a lot of fun in those two gears! It just takes a while to warm up.

Personally I think road biking is more dangerous than mountain biking, as far as bleeding risks are concerned. All my best crashes have been on pavement, including my best mountain bike crashes (see above). And pavement is usually where cars, driven by people who are talking or texting on smart-phones, hit you.

As far as endurance and energy output are concerned road biking, by its very nature, is easier to do in persistent atrial fibrillation that mountain biking. On a road bike you get into a groove, and have a certain steady energy output. That’s perfect for atrial fibrillation. Anybody who trail rides, especially on technical, steep trails, can tell you that mountain biking consists of a little burst of energy here, then a little short, brief period of rest and recovery here (by slow pedaling for a couple of seconds), and then hammering the pedals again to get over the next little obstacle, or whatever. That’s what’s fun about it – it’s almost like doing a puzzle. Trail riding involves a lot of little, short, anaerobic bursts of energy – and of course atrial fibrillation has diminished this ability, as far as I’m concerned.

Although, speaking strictly of endurance, I don’t think that is changed too much since I went into persistent atrial fibrillation. I can still ride for just as long as I used to be able to ride. I have found that while I have lost speed with age I have gained endurance in spite of atrial fibrillation.

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Moore Park Mountain Bike Trails

I am very interested in other mountain bikers’ experiences with atrial fibrillation, especially athletes who take rate control or anti-arrhythmic medications. Please feel free to leave comments – Thanks!

On Being Slow – Running with Atrial Fibrillation

Being in persistent atrial fibrillation is sort of like being a pickup truck with a four speed manual transmission, but you can only use second and third gear.

If you’re going to continue distance running in persistent atrial fibrillation you’d better expect to be slower.

I was already slow to begin with – my quickest marathon was four hours and forty minutes and it took me an hour to run a 10K. I’ve always avoided 5Ks because people in 5Ks simply run too fast. Once I was a back of the middle of the pack runner, well, now I’m truly a back of the pack runner.

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Training Run

I’ve always been a larger runner, and that’s definitely a factor in being slow. I’ve done a dozen marathons at over 6′ 3” and about 235 pounds, and have often felt that people would “mark” me, use me sort of as a target. I’ve felt particularly self-conscious about those people, often found in the back of the pack in a marathon, who will run up and pass me and then start walking – over and over again. This can be really annoying. One guy did that for 14 miles! I finally told him, “please either keep running or keep walking.” I know that these people are simply followers of Jeff Galloway (there are a lot of them in the back of a marathon pack), but it’s still annoying and it happens every race.

But if I was moderately slow before, I’m silly slow now. In an effort to preserve my pace I have actually lost about 40 pounds – but I don’t think I’ve even broken even. I had previously ran ten minute miles in shorter training runs, but now twelve minute miles are more common. As stated previously I had a cardioversion and was in sinus rhythm for thirty-three days – and at my new weight I was delighted to be able to train, for shorter runs, at a nine minute mile if I wanted to – but alas after a quick five-mile run in the thirty-third day I went back into persistent atrial fibrillation. I could feel it immediately and knew what had happened.

I imagine that a lot of athletes who are reading this blog are people who have had episodes of atrial fibrillation, or who go in and out of atrial fibrillation. I think people with intermittent atrial fibrillation become much more symptomatic and have a lot more trouble with training. They might not be able to train at all. But with persistent atrial fibrillation, at least in my experience, I have found that I stabilized and am able to train (a slower pace). You just have to get used to it.

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Back of the Pack – Haulin Aspen Trail Marathon and 1/2 Marathon

There are a few major differences, however. Prior to atrial fibrillation, like most runners, I would start out a long run at a fairly quick pace and more or less degrade as far as my pace was concerned as the miles accumulated. But with atrial fibrillation I actually start out quite slow, and after a mile or two find that I have picked up the pace quite a bit. I generally don’t do much interval training, but I imagine that is out of the question at this point. I live and train in the mountains and I can still run hills, but not really very quickly. When bicycling I find I don’t stand up and charge up hills any longer, but remain seated and spin more.

Being in persistent atrial fibrillation is sort of like being a pickup truck with a four speed manual transmission, but you can only use second and third gear. You start out pathetically slow, and your top speed is greatly diminished – but she can still drive as far as you want.

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Big Slow Runner – Before A Fib

The most important thing, of course, is that I am still able to continue trail running and mountain biking, and I am still able to participate in marathons and even ultra marathons. I still get to experience the sheer joy of slogging through a long trail run through the forest. I was never going to win any prizes to begin with, so what’s the difference?

Actually, I was delighted to get a medal for second place in my age group at the 2012 Bizz Johnson 50K, which I ran while in persistent atrial fibrillation. That was the first year they had a 50K at that event and there weren’t very many participants. I’m pretty sure that there were only two people in my age group, but still!

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Second Place (age group) Hell Yeah!!!!

One good thing about ultra running and marathon running, especially compared to 5Ks, for example, is that nobody really cares if you are slow. I was surprised that there were many people who finished behind me when I ran my first 50K in atrial fibrillation. Although it is kind of embarrassing to be so slow, you just have to change your mindset, and when you get involved with ultra sports, especially with atrial fibrillation, you need to simply enjoy yourself, enjoy the run, enjoy the trail, enjoy the people, and not worry about time.

If there are any other athletes reading this who are in persistent a fib, or intermittent a fib, I would love to hear about your experiences, and I encourage you to leave comments.

Running Alone

Even before I was in persistent atrial fibrillation I generally would like to run alone, although occasionally I run with my wife, Margo. Bike riding was different – I would often go for mountain bike or road rides with friends. At this point, however, I generally go alone so I can just keep my own slow pace.

Ninety-five percent of the running that I do is trail running, and almost all that is done with my dogs – so technically I don’t run alone. They don’t care how slow we go – they are simply glad to be out there.

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Ringo on Mount McLoughlin

Ringo is a blue healer, border collie cross and is a great trail dog. He behaves well off leash, never chases anything, and always stays with me. There are a couple of races around here that allow dogs and he always gets to go along for these events.

Our other dog, Sophie, is a husky/shepherd cross and pretty much needs to be on leash 100% of the time (otherwise she runs off after God knows what), which can be challenging for trail running. It pretty much completely eliminates Sophie as a mountain biking partner.

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Running at Lake of the Woods with Margo, Ringo, and Sophie

I often run in wilderness areas, or even remote trails near town, and sometimes worry about having a fall and getting hurt on the trail. I guess that just has to be an acceptable risk. I like to say I’d rather die in Sky Lakes Wilderness (our local wilderness) than at Sky Lakes Medical Center (our local hospital – where I am on the surgical staff) – but I feel sorry for they people who find me – imagine finding somebody on the trail . . . that big and that dead! As a precaution I always like to tell my wife where I’m going, and of course, I always have my cell phone with me. I usually take a bandanna along so I have something I can use for a tourniquet if necessary – don’t forget I am on a potent anticoagulant (Pradaxa).

I’d be interested in hearing from other runners and mountain bikers who are training while on anticoagulants and find out what type of precautions you take. Please feel free to leave a comment.

Heat and Salt and A Fib

As stated previously I get pretty lightheaded when I get up from a sitting position after a hard workout, particularly in hot weather. Orthostatic hypotension. I don’t know why I get dehydrated so easily now, but I have learned that I need to eat something salty and drink a lot of water  after a workout, particularly a run or a bike ride which is longer than an hour or two, otherwise I get pretty dizzy when I first standup, and I’ve had a friend who is an nephrologist and another friend who is an internist both tell me to make sure I drink plenty of water after a workout and get some salt. Just one more fun aspect of being in persistent atrial fibrillation.

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Pre-Race Motel

This is the first time in my life I’ve ever actually been trying to get more salt. Most people spend their lives trying to avoid salt. I have started bringing potato chips for a post run snack to the trailhead for my long runs. Another great post run snack is some blue corn chips with some hummus with some Hoisin sauce.

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Pre-Race

Although it is neither here nor there, I’d like to state that I am a vegetarian (nearly vegan – if not for the occasional veggie pizza) as far as diet is concerned.

I also find that I am more sensitive to heat, which is obviously related. Last summer I would often start to feel pretty tired 17 miles into a 20 mile training run. In cool weather a 20 mile trail run is no problem. When I’m training for a 50K I basically try to do a 20 mile run every weekend.

Fortunately I live in Klamath Falls, on the East side of the Cascades of Oregon, where we have relatively cold Winters and generally cool Spring and Autumn. Summer, obviously, can be pretty hot – but nothing like Southern California, Arizona, Mexico, the South, etc.

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Resting During a Trail Run

I have also noticed over the past several years that I did quite poorly during marathons if the weather got hot. The concept of hot weather is a relative term – for me anything over 70°F (21°C) would be considered hot. My ideal running weather would be 35 to 55°F. Ten years ago I could do a 20 mile run when it was 90°F (32°C) without much problem. Those days are over.

I’d be interested in hearing from other people with atrial fibrillation with respect to this. Please comment.

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Ringo – Pooped Out After a Long Trail Run

Persistent and Intermittent Atrial Fibrillation

There are different types of atrial fibrillation. They’re all the same arrhythmia, the main difference is duration. Some people have intermittent (or paroxysmal) atrial fibrillation. This means that the individual goes into atrial fibrillation for a short period of time – maybe a couple minutes, maybe twenty-four hours, but less than one week. Most of the descriptions of atrial fibrillation I have found on the web describe paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

Atrial fibrillation that lasts for longer than seven days is called persistent atrial fibrillation, and atrial fibrillation that lasts for over one year is referred to as long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation or permanent atrial fibrillation.

Regrettably that is the type of atrial fibrillation that I have. I have just “celebrated” my one year anniversary of persistent atrial fibrillation. I miss sinus rhythm.

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The Best Mile Marker

People who are in sinus rhythm most of the time and go into atrial fibrillation only occasionally are fortunate because they get to be in sinus rhythm most of the time, which is basically the hot set up for any type of endurance sports. The disadvantage is that when these individuals to go into atrial fibrillation the effects are pretty devastating, and more often than not they find themselves on their hands and knees wondering what happened. The other bad news for people with intermittent atrial fibrillation is that it may very well progress into a persistent type atrial fibrillation, and of course there is a risk of having a stroke. So it is important to discuss this and formulate an appropriate treatment plan with your healthcare provider.

The disadvantage of being in persistent, but relatively asymptomatic, atrial fibrillation is that you have a performance penalty all the time; but the advantage is that you stabilize, at least I have, and are able to participate in your sport, albeit at a slower pace. It never gets much worse or much better.

Maybe there are some athletes out there who are in persistent atrial fibrillation who are unable to continue to participate in running, mountain biking, etc. if so I would encourage you to share your stories in the comments section.

All unable to discuss at this point in time is my own personal experience.

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Bizz Johnson Marathon – I think I’ve done this one five times