Heat and Salt and A Fib

As stated previously I get pretty lightheaded when I get up from a sitting position after a hard workout, particularly in hot weather. Orthostatic hypotension. I don’t know why I get dehydrated so easily now, but I have learned that I need to eat something salty and drink a lot of water  after a workout, particularly a run or a bike ride which is longer than an hour or two, otherwise I get pretty dizzy when I first standup, and I’ve had a friend who is an nephrologist and another friend who is an internist both tell me to make sure I drink plenty of water after a workout and get some salt. Just one more fun aspect of being in persistent atrial fibrillation.

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Pre-Race Motel

This is the first time in my life I’ve ever actually been trying to get more salt. Most people spend their lives trying to avoid salt. I have started bringing potato chips for a post run snack to the trailhead for my long runs. Another great post run snack is some blue corn chips with some hummus with some Hoisin sauce.

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Pre-Race

Although it is neither here nor there, I’d like to state that I am a vegetarian (nearly vegan – if not for the occasional veggie pizza) as far as diet is concerned.

I also find that I am more sensitive to heat, which is obviously related. Last summer I would often start to feel pretty tired 17 miles into a 20 mile training run. In cool weather a 20 mile trail run is no problem. When I’m training for a 50K I basically try to do a 20 mile run every weekend.

Fortunately I live in Klamath Falls, on the East side of the Cascades of Oregon, where we have relatively cold Winters and generally cool Spring and Autumn. Summer, obviously, can be pretty hot – but nothing like Southern California, Arizona, Mexico, the South, etc.

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Resting During a Trail Run

I have also noticed over the past several years that I did quite poorly during marathons if the weather got hot. The concept of hot weather is a relative term – for me anything over 70°F (21°C) would be considered hot. My ideal running weather would be 35 to 55°F. Ten years ago I could do a 20 mile run when it was 90°F (32°C) without much problem. Those days are over.

I’d be interested in hearing from other people with atrial fibrillation with respect to this. Please comment.

ringotired

Ringo – Pooped Out After a Long Trail Run

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