Afib Runner News Update – Vitamin D Helps with Heart Failure & Exercise Helps Atrial Fibrillation Outcomes

brownmountaintrailBrown Mountain Trail

Vitamin D Helps with Heart Failure

I’m not certain this first item has much to do with readers of this blog – theoretically we are getting outside and getting plenty of sunshine, but a recent study showed that supplementation with high doses of vitamin D improved left ventricular structure and function in patients with chronic heart failure, although it doesn’t improve walking distance (citation below). I think the people in this study were a little worse off than a typical afib runner. In this study the non-placebo group received 4000 IU of vitamin D.

Personally, I like to supplement with vitamin D – one of two supplements that I take. I tested my vitamin D levels via a blood test several years ago and was at the low end of normal even with modest supplementation. This is interesting considering that I was running about 35 miles a week, all outdoors!

The other supplement I take is B complex – pretty standard for vegetarians.

Good news for fib runners: Exercise is good for your a trial fibrillation!

At the recent American College of Cardiology’s 65th Annual Scientific Session & Expo, findings were presented that show exercise reduces risk of cardiovascular death and all cause death. And it appears that the more you exercise the better the outcome.

I have a citation below, but I will summarize by saying that in a European study with over 2000 patients, subjects were divided into four groups based on weekly exercise: none (38.9%), occasional (34.7%), regular (21.7%), and intense (4.7%). In a two year follow up it was determined the “regular” and “intense” group had lower death rate, improved outcomes, etc. And of course the “intense” group did better than the “regular”, “regular” did better than “Occasional,” etc.

So there you go – justification for continuing to work out with atrial fibrillation. It seems obvious but it is nice to see proof.

Vitamin D and hearth failure:

Witte KK, Byrom R, Gierula J, et al. Effects of vitamin D on cardiac function in patients with chronic HF: the VINDICATE study [published online April 2016]. J Am Coll Cardiol. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2016.03.508.

Exercise and afib:

Proietti M, Boriani G, Laroche C, et al. Physical activity and major adverse events in patients with atrial fibrillation: A report from the EURObservational research programme pilot survey on atrial fibrillation (EORP-AF) general registry. Paper presented at: 65th Annual Scientific Session & Expo; April 4, 2016; Chicago, IL. http://www.abstractsonline.com/pp8/#!/3874/presentation/42867.

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Running and Mountain Biking with Atrial Fibrillation? Get a Road I.D.

I used the see the Road I.D. commercials while watching the Tour de France and think, “Why would anybody buy a thing like that?” That was before I went into persistent atrial fibrillation and started taking a potent anticoagulant (Pradaxa).

Now something as ordinary and routine as falling down on a trail run or crashing on a mountain bike can become a big deal – maybe even a life and death situation.

roadID

My Road I.D. has my name, year of birth, hometown, my wife’s number and my sister’s number. Also it indicates that I am in Atrial Fibrillation, have no drug allergies, and am taking Pradaxa – an anticoagulant.

This way if I am found dead they know who I am and who to call to come pick up the bike and the body. If I’m still alive they will know about the atrial fibrillation and the anticoagulant. Pradaxa doesn’t have a reversal agent but any medical personnel will know to watch for bleeding and start an IV to push fluids. It certainly couldn’t hurt.

road__id
Wearing my Road I.D. at a pizza parlor

I wear mine whenever I ride or run, and also whenever I drive. I take it off at work.

I was half joking when I said “if I’m found dead” but somebody (I can’t recall who) recently noticed my Road I.D. and said he wished his friend (brother-in-law?) had had one. Evidently he had gone out for a run and died out there (for whatever reason) and had no identification. Nobody knew who he was so they put the body in the morgue for the weekend. I seem to recall that the wife was out of town and they had a hard time figuring out who he was. Eventually when they started to figure out who he was and one of his children had to come from out of town to identify the body. I wish I could remember the details more clearly – but at any rate a Road I.D. wristband would simplify a situation like that.

There’s nothing special or unique about a Road I.D. – any medical alert bracelet would be fine; but a Road I.D. just seems cooler. It’s durable, comes in cool colors, and is highly customizable, it cleans up well when worn in the post work out shower, and goes on and off easily.